Tag Archives: miso

Peanut Miso Kale Chips – A New Favorite!

kale miso 2

A couple of years back, I did a post on these Kale Chips, but I’m here to tell you today that I’ve vastly improved them! These are the most delectable Kale Chips ever, and if they were sold in a bag, I’m sure they would fetch the usual $5.00 or so price tag for just a mere handful! The flavor is as wonderful as ever, but I discovered that using Tuscan Kale, removing every single hint of stem, and a new cooking method takes these chips to a higher level.

Tuscan Kale is the kind of kale with flat leaves, unlike their curly leafed cousin.

kale trimmed

I trim each leaf with kitchen shears, and save the stems. I cut the stems into short pieces, or process in a food processor and steam for later usage.

kale with scissors

Kale in steamer -- steam for about 10-12 minutes depending on how chewy you like it.

Kale stems in steamer — steam for about 10-12 minutes depending on how chewy you like it.

I mix together the sauce ingredients in a bowl:

peanut sauce

Then coat the kale leaves completely. It is OK if there is just a hint of the sauce on the leaves — it packs a flavorful punch and a little goes a long way!

Spread kale out in a single layer on lined baking sheets. Put in a preheated 375 F degree oven. Turn off oven and let sit for 30-60 minutes, checking after 20 minutes.

The chips are perfectly crisp with no brown edges!

kale miso

If you want an even faster recipe, just make the kale chips without the sauce. Cooking time is 20 minutes. I like to spray with olive oil and season with kosher salt.

kale

Look how thin it is!

Look how thin it is!

These chips keep in an air tight container for about two days, and they stay crisp! I have also tried them with a sprinkle of nutritional yeast (parmesan would probably taste better, but if you want to go vegan…) and taco seasoning.

kale-chip-with-yeast

kale with yeast 2

My favorite is the peanut miso flavor though! 🙂 Have a try and let me know what you think. Which do you like best?

Peanut Butter and Miso Glazed Kale Chips

1 tablespoon peanut butter

1 teaspoon miso paste

1 teaspoon soy sauce

1 teaspoon mirin (or rice wine vinegar if you don’t have it)

2 teaspoons water

A large bunch of Tuscan Kale

non-stick spray

1.  Preheat oven to 375 degrees and line two baking sheets with parchment or foil. Spray foil with non-stick spray. Set aside.

2.  Wash kale leaves and pat dry. Then cut away each side of the stem per leaf, reserving leaf parts. Save stems for later use (I like to chop mine and steam them).

3.  In a large bowl whisk together peanut butter, miso paste, soy sauce, and mirin with a whisk. Add water and whisk until smooth. Throw in kale leaves and coat and massage with clean hands to get the sauce on all of the leaves. Spread leaves in a single layer on lined baking sheets. Spray with non-stick spray. You will have extra. You can save these to bake for another time. Turn off oven.

4.  Place baking sheets in oven and let sit for one hour. Halfway through baking, stir the leaves and turn over.

5.  When chips are crisp, transfer to a plate and let cool completely.

Plain Kale Chips

1 bunch Tuscan Kale

non-stick spray

kosher salt to taste

1.  Preheat oven to 375 degrees and line two baking sheets with parchment or foil. Spray foil with non-stick spray. Set aside.

2.  Wash kale leaves and pat dry. Then cut away each side of the stem per leaf, reserving leaf parts. Save stems for later use (I like to chop mine and steam them).

3.  Spread leaves in a single layer on lined baking sheets. Spray with non-stick spray. You will have extra. You can save these to bake for another time. Season with kosher salt. Turn off oven.

4.  Place baking sheets in oven and let sit for 20 minutes, checking after 12 minutes.

5.  When chips are crisp, transfer to a plate and let cool completely.

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Filed under Appetizers, Gluten Free, Sides

Peanut Miso Glazed Roasted Kale Chips and Winner!

Thanks to all who participated in my signed copy of Soup Day giveaway!

I loved hearing all about your favorite soups!

From Soup Day, Henry Holt 2010

I’m happy to announce that the winner of the giveaway is:   Michelle!

I will contact you and send you a signed copy this week.

I hope the child you give it to is inspired to play in the kitchen and enjoys my book! 🙂

**********************************************************************

Remember when I was swooning over Trader Joe’s roasted seaweed?  Well, I think I’ve created a great cheaper, healthier alternative.  Kale chips have been around in the blog sphere for quite awhile, but it was fellow home cook, Alexandra, that I learned of slow roasting them and coating them with a sort of sauce.  I didn’t have the ingredients she uses on hand, so I made up my own using peanut butter, miso, soy, mirin, sesame oil, and some water.  The second time I tried it, I threw in some sugar.  I’m telling you, they are addictive.

Look at the peanut butter and miso yumminess!

I was blasting my kale chips at 400 degrees before and they always had burnt edges.  Slow cooking them creates the crispiest, crunchiest kale leaves with no burns anywhere.  The texture is a lot like roasted seaweed.  But this way, you are getting all the vitamins, antioxidants, and fiber that kale has to offer.

I love the nuttiness of the peanut butter and miso and the salty, sweet flavor combination these chips have.  Try it.  It may make a kale lover out of you! 🙂

Peanut Butter and Miso Glazed Kale Chips

1 tablespoon peanut butter

1 teaspoon miso paste

1 teaspoon soy sauce

1 teaspoon mirin (or rice wine vinegar if you don’t have it)

1 teaspoon sugar

2 teaspoons water

8 cups of kale leaves torn into chip size pieces

non-stick spray

1.  Preheat oven to 200 degrees and line two baking sheets with parchment or foil.  Set aside.

2.  In a large bowl whisk together peanut butter, miso paste, soy sauce, mirin, and sugar with a whisk.  Add water and whisk until smooth.

3.  Throw in kale leaves and coat and massage with clean hands to get the sauce on all of the leaves.  Spread leaves in one layer on lined baking sheet.

4.  Bake for one hour.  Halfway through baking, stir the leaves and turn over.

Makes about two servings.  You could probably double the recipe and use two baking sheets on different racks.  I will do this next time, because I could easily eat the two servings in one sitting — it’s hard to stop!

Note:  Don’t do this!  I tried it while in California, and the leaves get too crowded and don’t dry out properly, and it took forever.  Better to do a single batch and roast on two baking sheets!

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Filed under Appetizers, Art Related, Sides, Vegan, Vegetables, Vegetarian

Green as a Bean: Another Class Visit and Miso Green Beans

Happy St. Patrick’s Day!

I thought today it would be appropriate to share some green artwork and some green food. 🙂

Earlier this month, I did my third visit to the Kindergarten classes at PS 142 and read one of my favorite book that I have illustrated, called Green As A Bean.  It is based on a wonderful poem, written in the 60s by the late Karla Kuskin.  The poem was recast as a picture books and was published several years ago.  Written in lyrical rhyme, the verse asks the reader to imagine what they might be like if they were green, soft, loud, fierce, bright…

I painted this soon after my son was born, so I had to include him -- he's the hanging baby bean.

If you were fierce...

I loved painting the illustrations because the story is so open-ended.  It was such a pleasure to create the “world” of this book.

I read it to the children in class and spoke to them about “words that describe things” (i.e. adjectives).  Then we narrowed it down to colors, since they have been studying color charts during their regular class time.  I had them imagine if they were a particular color, what would they be?

It was a nice way to ease the kids into writing down their thoughts and illustrating them.  Here are some of their creations.

blue flowers

a purple princess

a green dragon

Getting back to the color green…
It is sometimes difficult getting my son to eat enough green food.  Today I made him some special green vanilla yogurt (with the help of food coloring, not scary spores!) and he gobbled it up.  But I’m talking about real green food, namely green veggies.

One of the very few green vegetables he’s been eating since he started eating solids, though, are green beans.  I think it’s because early on I developed a recipe he loved:  Miso Green Beans.  I use Trader Joe’s French green beans — they are so good and reasonably priced. (I just hope they don’t discontinue them, as they have a tendency to do with food I love!)I make a thin paste with miso and some water and season with a bit of sugar.

"shiro" (white) more mild than "aka" (red) -- the darker the miso paste, the stronger the flavor

Then I drizzle this over cooked green beans and saute them until they are slightly browned and a bit caramelized.

They have a nice sweet and savory flavor.  You can garnish with some toasted sesame seeds for added crunch.  It also brings out the nutty sesame flavor of the sesame oil the beans are sauteed in.

Miso paste can be found in Asian food stores and health food stores.  I also love to use it in salad dressing.

Miso Green Beans

3 cups of fresh or frozen French beans

2 teaspoons sesame oil

1 ½  teaspoon miso paste

½ teaspoon sugar

  1. Steam green beans until crisp tender in steamer or microwave. Drain.
  2. Saute beans in oil until softened a little.
  3. Mix miso paste, sugar and about 1 teaspoon of water in a bowl.  Add to beans and saute vigorously until beans are slightly carmelized.
  4. Serve immediately.

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Filed under Art Related, Children, Sides, Vegetables

Roasted Sweet Potato, Eggplant, and Beet Dishes: Winter Comfort Food

Wishing everyone a  happy + healthy + prosperous 2011!!

Our brownstone's stairs pre-shoveling

These days, with blizzards, mounds of snow, and breezes that make my face ache, all I want is to be warm and cozy indoors.

I roast a lot of vegetables throughout the year, but I find myself doing it in full force during the cold winter months.  Yesterday, I roasted several sweet potatoes, a large eggplant, and a beet.

When cooking vegetables,  if you have the time,  throw them in the oven—skip the microwave and steamer (and forget about boiling!).  Roasting brings out their flavors and tastes far superior.  The extra oven heat is a plus when it’s cold outside as well.  It is easy to cook a lot at one time, and then you will have a supply of roasted vegetables that can be enjoyed in various dishes.  Check out my earlier post on Easy Weeknight Dinners for some more examples.

My favorites are sweet potatoes.  Through high temperature roasting, they caramelize and weep syrup from the holes I pricked in their skins  before baking in the oven.

The other day I spied some Asian sweet potatoes at the green grocer’s so I got one to roast along with some of the orange varieties more commonly found around here. The flavor is a little more subtle than the orange fleshed sweet potatoes, but just as delicious.  They are both so good, I can eat them plain sans butter or sweetener.

Incidentally, sweet potatoes are not the same as yams, which are members of a different plant family.  Here in the US, we often use the term  “yam” for the brown skinned sweet potatoes with orange flesh.  But they are really sweet potatoes.  Real yams are tubers and grown in tropical climates and have dark brown or black skin that is not as smooth as that of a sweet potato.

I made sweet potato fries for my husband and baked the other one whole for myself and my son to share.  The only way he’ll eat sweet potato is  if it is pureed and topped with marshmallows.  I’m hoping later in life he’ll learn to appreciate the unadorned version, but for now, it’s a great way to get some vitamins A and C into him.

I tried a little experiment with a large eggplant this time.  Usually,  I chop the whole thing up into cubes and toss them in olive oil and then roast.  But I wanted to make a Japanese dish which involves dressing the eggplant with a miso sauce and then broiling it.  Japanese eggplant are long and skinny and cook quickly.  Their counterparts commonly found here are gigantic by comparison.  I tried slicing a large one into thick slices and basted them with olive oil.  I tested Cooking Light’s Chef Billy Strynkowski’s theory that these days, eggplant doesn’t have to be salted beforehand to draw out any bitter flavor.  When he told me this during the photo shoot, I was dubious, but it turns out he is right!

The flesh was creamy and silky with no hint of bitterness.  I’m so happy I can skip the salting altogether. 🙂

My version of the miso sauce is thinner than traditional ones. I’ve even seen it made with egg yolk.  The miso has such a strong flavor and is very high in sodium.  I feel like my thinner sauce is a nice alternative.

You can peel off the skin and discard or eat it for more fiber. 🙂

Another favorite of mine is roasted beets.  I just make a couple of piercings in the skin and wrap a whole beet in foil (after washing it).  So easy and no staining of fingers necessary!  When it’s fully cooked, it’s easy to peel off the skin.  I love them in salads.    They are so hearty and go well with tangy goat cheese (or blue cheese) and mellow toasted walnuts.   I toss it all in a Honey Dijon Balsamic Vinaigrette.  The added crunch from some raw celery and Fuji apple, and the sweet chewiness of dried cranberries round out the flavors and textures.  This is one of my favorite salads.

Oops -- took photo before I added the dried cranberries...

Other veggies I love to roast are sliced cauliflower, brussel sprouts, asparagus, zucchini, tomatoes, carrots, butternut squash, whole heads of garlic wrapped in foil.  With the exception of the garlic, the roasting method is generally the same:  toss in oil, sprinkle with salt, pepper or other seasonings, and roast in oven for 30-60 minutes depending on size of vegetable and what kind of texture you prefer.  So simple.

Sweet Potato Fries

2 sweet potatoes

olive oil

kosher salt

  1. Preheat oven to 425 degrees.
  2. Wash sweet potatoes well.  Cut in half, then cut into thick wedges.  Brush liberally with olive oil and sprinkle with salt.
  3. Roast in oven for about 30 minutes.

Jamie’s Marshmallow Sweet Potatoes

½ cup cooked sweet potato

1 teaspoon butter

2-4 tablespoons milk

½ teaspoon cinnamon

Mini marshmallows (or one large marshmallow, cut into small pieces with kitchen shears)

  1. Heat potato with butter, milk, and cinnamon.  Blend with an immersion blender.
  2. Transfer to a small ramekin and top with mini marshmallows.  Toast in toaster oven for about 3 minutes (or broil in oven).

Broiled Eggplant with Miso Sauce

1 large eggplant (this dish originates in Japan and uses Japanese eggplant.  Since it is harder to find here, I make a version that works well with the large eggplant that is common in the US).

Olive oil

Kosher salt

1 tablespoon miso paste

1 tablespoon hot water

2 teaspoons mirin

2 teaspoons sugar

  1. Preheat oven to 425 degrees.
  2. Wash eggplant and cut into thick ¾ -inch slices.  Arrange on baking sheet.  Generously baste with olive oil on both sides. Sprinkle with salt.
  3. Roast eggplant slices for about 30-35 minutes until flesh is soft.
  4. Gently stir miso paste and water together until paste is dissolved.  Add mirin and sugar.
  5. Spoon sauce onto roasted eggplant slices.  Broil for about 4-5 minutes, taking care not to overcook the topping.

Roasted Beet Salad with Goat Cheese and Apple

4 cups of mesclun greens

1 large apple, cored, sliced and julliened (I love Fuji apples)

8 oz. of roasted beet, chopped in ½” cubes

1 celery rib, finely chopped

Honey Dijon Balsamic Vinaigrette (see below) to taste

About 2 oz. of goat cheese

Toasted walnuts, chopped

  1. Toss greens, apple and roasted beet together with vinaigrette.
  2. Sprinkle goat cheese and toasted walnuts on top.

Honey Dijon Balsamic Vinaigrette

½ teaspoon sugar

1 teaspoon honey mustard

2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar

4 tablespoons olive oil

pinch of kosher salt

freshly ground pepper

1.  Stir sugar and honey mustard together.  Whisk in balsamic vinegar.  Whisk in olive oil until emulsified.  Add salt and pepper to taste.

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Filed under Sides, Vegetables